Slating like a Butler

johnbrawley

R374_20130612_225712

Slates….

They’re a tribalistic filmaking ritual.  Even in this digital age they are still ever present, a 100 year old filmaking tradition.  It also seems these days there are a gazillion slate “apps” that all ape the original concept…. two bits of wood being banged together on a board made of slate that you can write on.

The slate, as much as the camera itself, has become an icon for representing filmaking in action. Even the general public know that they’re an intrinsic part of the process.

There is of course a serious and useful purpose to slates, but that original purpose has also grown and transformed as well.

So really, let’s consider, what IS the purpose of the slate ?  Well, there are two primary reasons to slate.

The first is to provide a synchronisation reference for double system sound syncing.  An audible clap with a visual reference so…

View original post 2,220 more words

Everything looks better on KODACHROME – K-Tone LUT

Frank Glencairn

Many moons ago, I made a Profile for the FS100, that mimics (as good as possible) the look of vintage Kodachrome film. Now I made a LUT that does the same. I kind of “re-engineered”  the KODACHROME 828, daylight & Type A material, that was made from 1936 to 1962. This is the film that came out before the K-11 processing. It has a very nice “Vintage-Sweet-Home-Alabama-Look” to it, and gives you some very special red, yellow and blue tones. It also has a certain elegance and poetry to it that I really love. The K-TONE is a 3D cube LUT that plays nice wit most NLEs and color grading programs. The K-Tone LUT is expecting Log footage as input. 

Kodachrome was manufactured by Eastman Kodak from 1935 to 2009. Kodachrome was the first successfully mass-marketed color still film using a subtractive method, in contrast to earlier additive “screenplate” methods…

View original post 270 more words